Technology » Science

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Few Safeguards for Foster Kids on Psych Drugs

Few Safeguards for Foster Kids on Psych Drugs

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar | Sep 19
Thousands of children in foster care may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without basic safeguards, according to a federal watchdog's investigation that finds a failure to care for youngsters whose lives have already been disrupted

Scientists: World's Warming; Expect More Intense Hurricanes

Scientists: World's Warming; Expect More Intense Hurricanes

By Seth Borenstein | Sep 18
A warmer world makes for nastier hurricanes. Scientists say they are wetter, possess more energy and intensify faster.

Experts: Mayan Altar Hints At Ancient Intrigue

Experts: Mayan Altar Hints At Ancient Intrigue

Sep 18
An altar found at Guatemala's La Corona site suggests the Mayan dynasty of Kaanul, known as the Snake Kings, acted like its namesake in slowly squeezing the rival kingdom of Tikal, archaeologists said Friday.

Boss Revenge, Self-Colonoscopy Studies Win 2018 Ig Nobels

Boss Revenge, Self-Colonoscopy Studies Win 2018 Ig Nobels

By Mark Pratt | Sep 17
The prizes at the 28th annual ceremony at Harvard University were being handed out by real Nobel laureates.

SpaceX Plans to Send Tourists Around the Moon

SpaceX Plans to Send Tourists Around the Moon

By Marcia Dunn | Sep 17
SpaceX said it has signed the first private moon traveler, with some changes to its original game plan.

NASA Satellite Launched to Measure Earth's Ice Changes

NASA Satellite Launched to Measure Earth's Ice Changes

Sep 16
A NASA satellite designed to precisely measure changes in Earth's ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice and vegetation was launched into polar orbit from California early Saturday.

Lab Test May Identify Dangerous Gene Mutations, Study Finds

Lab Test May Identify Dangerous Gene Mutations, Study Finds

By Malcolm Ritter | Sep 16
Scientists say they've found a new way to help determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results.

#Ancient? Crisscrossed Lines Called World's Oldest Drawing

#Ancient? Crisscrossed Lines Called World's Oldest Drawing

By Malcolm Ritter | Sep 16
It looks a bit like a hashtag, but it's 73,000 years old. And scientists say this tiny sketch found in a South African cave is the oldest known drawing.

Scientists Look to Map the Genes of Thousands of Animals

Scientists Look to Map the Genes of Thousands of Animals

By Patrick Whittle | Sep 15
A group of scientists unveiled the first results Thursday of an ambitious effort to map the genes of tens of thousands of animal species, a project they said could help save animals from extinction down the line.

Royal Botanic Garden Seeks Respect for World's Fungus

Royal Botanic Garden Seeks Respect for World's Fungus

By Gregory Katz | Sep 15
The scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew are trying to correct an injustice: They don't believe fungus gets the respect it deserves.

Ohio Awards Latest Prizes in Opioid Science Challenge

Ohio Awards Latest Prizes in Opioid Science Challenge

By Julie Carr Smyth | Sep 14
Ohio awarded another round of prizes totaling $2.4 million Wednesday in its global technology challenge seeking scientific breakthroughs to address the U.S. opioid crisis.

AP Explains: How Hurricanes Unleash Lethal Storm Surges

AP Explains: How Hurricanes Unleash Lethal Storm Surges

Sep 14
Storm surges aren't walls of water, like a tsunami, as commonly thought. Caused by a hurricane's winds pushing relentlessly on the shore, they are more like domes of high water that form as the ocean spreads inland.

For Meteorologists, Florence 'Is A Horrific Nightmare Storm'

For Meteorologists, Florence 'Is A Horrific Nightmare Storm'

By Seth Borenstein | Sep 13
Oddly, the closer Hurricane Florence gets to land, the murkier its future gets.

Active Shooter Study: Semi-Automatic Rifles More Deadly

Active Shooter Study: Semi-Automatic Rifles More Deadly

By Lindsey Tanner | Sep 13
Active shooters with semi-automatic rifles wound and kill twice as many people as those using weapons that don't self-load, although chances of dying if hit in either type of assault are the same, a new analysis shows.

Moon Rock Hunter Closes In on Tracking Down Missing Stones

Moon Rock Hunter Closes In on Tracking Down Missing Stones

By Lindsay Whitehurst | Sep 13
A strange thing happened after Neil Armstrong and the Apollo 11 crew returned from the moon with lunar rocks: Many of the mementos given to every U.S. state vanished.

1 thru 15 of 1932 Stories